September 20, 2018
Arts & Entertainment
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  • “Oak Bones” is about a woman carved from wood and her experiences in the outside world.
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    “Oak Bones” is about a woman carved from wood and her experiences in the outside world.
  • The World War II action short “Does the Owl Fly” will premiere at the Adirondack Film Festival this October. A historical fiction piece, it is based on two women who worked undercover.
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    The World War II action short “Does the Owl Fly” will premiere at the Adirondack Film Festival this October. A historical fiction piece, it is based on two women who worked undercover.

Severna Park Filmmaker Aims To Engage And Inform

Zach Sparks
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September 5, 2018

Fantasy And Symbolism Are Hallmarks Of Lindsay Corriveau’s Work

As a child, she was enamored of the tale of children stumbling through a wardrobe to find a mythical world plagued by perpetual winter. Then came the story of a wizard with a lightning-shaped scar on his forehead. And later, the heartfelt tales of “Stranger Than Fiction” and “Forrest Gump.”

“I was always interested in storytelling and writing books,” said Lindsay Corriveau of Severna Park. “My first story memories: ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ and ‘Rainbow Fish.’ Then the modern classics: ‘Chronicles of Narnia,’ ‘Harry Potter,’ and ‘Lord of the Rings’ — big epics with danger and fantasy and a ton of symbolism.”

A New York native, Corriveau strives to imbue those traits in her own films, which are meant to be meaningful and engaging. While she primarily works as a director and cinematographer, she also does acting, writing, editing, production design, and art direction.

Corriveau is currently seeking private investment for her first feature film, which she plans to direct in New Zealand.

“It's essentially about a boy who finds a mermaid washed up on a beach who matches the description of a woman that went missing three days prior,” Corriveau said. “It's a mystery-thriller that toys with the way children deal with trauma and cannot always communicate in a way that makes sense to adults. The boy is based off of my two adopted brothers, one of which died two years ago and the other who has a brain injury.”

For her most recent project, Corriveau went back in time. Her World War II action short “Does the Owl Fly” will premiere at the Adirondack Film Festival this October. A historical fiction piece, “Does the Owl Fly” is based on two women who worked undercover and sacrificed their safety for their respective causes.

“I honestly just think it's incredible how far up these women got in a time where they were expected to stay home,” Corriveau said. “They're absolute firecrackers, and generally speaking, their heroic stories are left untold to the general public.”

Visually, she was inspired by snowy scenes in the movie “Hannah.” She also lauded the drone work of David Hsu.

“I'm hoping the simple farm setting and the authenticity of the winter we endured to film this will breathe new life into our setting,” she said.

After winning 11 awards, including Best Short at the Chesapeake Film Festival and Best Cinematography at Blackbird Film Festival in New York, another project, “Oak Bones,” is primed for a public release. Corriveau’s singular directorial debut, “Oak Bones” is about a woman carved from wood and her experiences in the outside world. Locals may have seen “Oak Bones” during the Annapolis Film Festival.

READ MORE: Lindsay Corriveau Gets Ready To Make Her Pitch At Annapolis Film Festival

Corriveau made her directorial debut with a partner earlier in 2017 with “Like Rain.”

“Like Rain” contained mature topics like drug use, sexual assault, and infidelity. It was co-directed by Kayla Caracci and produced by Alicia Sims.

Excess funds from “Like Rain” were donated to a domestic abuse shelter in Pennsylvania.

“We want people who see the film to know without a doubt that we did it to empathize with those who’ve endured abuse or discrimination, and lend understanding to those who haven’t,” Corriveau said. “We will not and never will profit off that film.”

While filming has taken her across the world, Corriveau would eventually like to settle in Atlanta or Los Angeles. Along the way, she hopes to pay her bills and help her parents retire.

“But also I just want to feel like the works I do make a difference to someone, whether it's a laugh when they need it, or some excitement, or something reflective,” she said. “I want to make works that are honest to the characters and subject matter, whose stories are entertaining, message clear, but that are still artistically sound. I would like to direct features and become a part of this creative Mecca that is ever changing. I'd like to publish a book, maybe win an award so big I make my mom cry. That'd be nice.”

To learn more about Corriveau or to inquire about being a crew member for her upcoming film, visit www.lindsaycorriveau.com.


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